Posts Tagged "Winter"

Winter Jing Tonic Cabbage Soup

Posted by on Jan 15, 2017

Winter Jing Tonic Cabbage Soup   Winter  is the ideal time to nourish what Chinese Medicine calls the Kidney energy, associated with the deepest level of body energy, Jing/Essence.   Winter Storage in Chinese Medicine Winter is the season in ancient Chinese philosophy associated with storage, when the essences of the previous year are distilled into wisdom. Not surprisingly, even in European literature and poetry, winter, then, is a metaphor for old age, if is the final season in the cycle of birth and death. The goal of life is wisdom, the goal of the agricultural year is to...

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The Spiritual Qualities of Vata in Winter

Posted by on Dec 14, 2016

Late Autumn and Early Winter are the times of year dominated by Vata dosha in Ayurveda. The warm rays of the Sun are at their minimum around Winter Solstice. The darkness of night time is at its maximum. And what is darkness if not the unknown? And what stimulates fear, if not the unknown. And is not death the greatest unknown of all, that all humans are naturally afraid of. And which month symbolizes death? Spring is growth and life and new things green. Summer is the accomplishment of all that Spring started. Autumn is the harvest, but also...

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Ayurvedic Winter Spice Churna

Posted by on Jan 7, 2016

Ayurvedic Winter Spice Churna are “masalas” (spice mixtures) used to boost immunity by improving digestion and stimulating Agni digestive fire. They are used year round, but can be especially good in Winter and also for Ama/toxin accumulation. They can be tailored to all three doshas, Vata, Pitta, and Kapha. The following Ayurvedic winter spice churna is a tri-doshic mix of spices, suitable for Winter, but that will not aggravate any one dosha and pacifies them all, because it is a mix of bitter, pungent, and sweet spices. Someone with a strong Pitta elevation with symptoms of burning in the...

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Winter and Sleep in Chinese Medicine: Kidney Qi

Posted by on Dec 22, 2015

Winter and Sleep in Chinese Medicine: Kidney Qi Winter and Sleep In the Classics of Chinese Medicine Its Winter. Classical Chinese Medicine has this to say about it. “Go to sleep early, but get up LATE, after the sun has risen.” Makes total sense because as an animal you don’t want to waste your valuable energy heating your body up against the cold morning, when you can wait for the sun to do its job first. Its also about respecting the biorhythms of the biological clock. Kidney Qi in Chinese Medicine: Metaphor for the Deepest Levels of Vitality Winter...

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Diet and Nutrition in Chinese Medicine: Wakame Sea Veggie to Nourish Kidney Yin and Cleanse Lymphatics

Posted by on Dec 13, 2015

Diet and Nutrition in Chinese Medicine: Nourish Kidney Yin and Cleanse in Winter with Sea Veggies Winter and the Kidney Qi in Chinese Medical Theory In winter the Qi enters the Kidneys, the physically lowest of the Zang/Solid internal organs, and the energetically deepest. Energetically deepest because the Kidneys are the root of all Yin and Yang in the body, and as such governs growth and development from conception, but also reproduction after puberty. Grow, development, and reproduction are very deep foundational aspects of the body’s energy, and in the case of reproduction this means that the Kidney’s Qi...

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Bone Marrow Soup, Part 2: Winter

Posted by on Jan 24, 2015

Bone Marrow Soup, Part 2: Winter In cold weather its natural to crave warm food. And the alchemical transformation of solids into liquids, of vegetables and meats or bones into soup, is a way of liberating the essence of these foodstuff into a substance that is much closer to blood, which is the destiny of all food, than foods as solids themselves. That is why when you are sick in China, India, or even Europe and the USA when I was a kid, your mom gave you easily digested liquids and solids like tea and dry toast, or chicken...

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R-U-Ved ProVata Tea

Posted by on Jan 17, 2014

R-U-Ved ProVata Tea A simple way to take the edge off of the cold, windy, dryness of the late Autumn early Winter Vata season is with Ayush’s R-U-Ved ProVata Tea. I have no stock in this company, and get nothing but good karma for recommending their fine products. You can easily make your own, too, though the tea bags are so convenient, especially with travel. R-U-Ved ProVata tea  is pro-Vata in the sense that it promotes balanced Vata; that is, it reduces Vata. We reduce, or pacify our doshas, because their natural tendency is to increase when our lifestyle, diet,...

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Vata in Winter

Posted by on Jan 17, 2014

I would like to talk about one of my favorite teas to pacify Vata in Winter: R-U-Ved ProVata Tea. First, though, lets just talk about the relationship between what happens to Vata in Winter and the qualities of the elements Air and Space, or Wind and Ether (as in etheric)  that the Vata dosha is a manifestion of.   Ayurveda describes the ways in which different kinds of foods, climates, activities, exercises, relationships attitudes, mental training, cultural ethos, stages of life, and times of year and the day can either elevate (increase, vitiate, aggravate) or pacify (balance or reduce)...

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Ginger Root Tea Recipe for Winter

Posted by on Dec 16, 2013

Here is a great ginger root tea recipe for cold weather in Winter or Late Autumn. A basic principle in Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda is that life is a warm process. Its a process of warm transformation of cold air and raw food stuffs into warm, 98.5 degree blood and, in the stomach, a digestive soup that is 101 degrees, even warmer than the body temp overall. This basis of life, the transformation of air, food, and sleep into the energy of life is a process involving gas exchanges, maceration, chemical lysis, etc. It is a process that takes...

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Autumn in Chinese Medicine

Posted by on Oct 22, 2013

Autumn Fall Autumn in Chinese Medicine is the time of falling, hence its secondary name. Spring up, Fall down.  In fact we even use the word autumn to describe a period in the human life span, the autumnal years, a period of beautiful maturity that is also verging on decline. In Autumn the celestial Qi, which is another way of describing the effects of the sun, moon, stars, and of course the weather (that in turn is a function of the effects of the sun in terms of the seasons), recedes in Autumn from its full bloom of summer....

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Allergies and Sinusitis in Autumn

Posted by on Oct 17, 2013

People suffering from allergies and sinus conditions in the Autumn in San Diego dread the dry heat that wafts in from the desert during the “Santa Ana” conditions. This movement of air from the east brings with it dust, pollen and other un-pleasantries like agrarian pollutants from the Imperial Valley. At its best the Santa Anas are simply dry, at their worst, dry, windy and very hot. Allergies and sinus conditions are worsened by this weather. What can you do? Acupuncture My first line of treatment for allergies is acupuncture and cupping. Acupuncture can help nip respiratory allergies (allergic...

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Daikon Radish: Detoxify and Promote Digestion

Posted by on Feb 23, 2013

Daikon Radish is a great soup or salad vegetable. It is spicy, and acts as a digestive by stimulating digestive fire, just as the small radishes that Mexicanos eat with corn and meat do, but it is more aromatic, especially when boiled, than the small radishes and not as hot. Daikon is used in Chinese Medicine Nutritional therapy to balance heavier foods that are high in harder to digest animal protein and fat, like beef or pork. Beef and pork, which are are also neutral and cool in natural temperature, easily produce toxic dampness when eaten in excess, because...

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Come in from the Cold Ayurveda Winter Tea

Posted by on Jan 12, 2013

Tonight it was quite cold for San Diego and I walked to my friend’s house and then we went out again, so when we came back in I made an Ayurveda winter tea.  We put on a small kettle and I placed in the tea pot: Fresh Ginger Slices, 5 Cloves 4 Cassia Twig 1 inch, broken Ginger Powder, 1 tsp Cinnamon Powder ½ tsp Cumin ¾ tsp Thyme ½ tsp Black Peppercorn 5 and then poured in about 2 cups of water just off the boil. Now Thyme is an excellent herb for winter for the lungs, it...

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Wakame Sea Vegetable with Turnip, Pear, and American Ginseng

Posted by on Dec 5, 2012

    Wakame is a delicate, mild tasting, low calorie sea vegetable with a succulent texture. A favorite food in Japanese and Korean cuisine, it is traditionally cooked in miso soup, served on its own as a cold side dish (sunomono), or cooked with foods like kabocha squash. It can be adapted into American cooking in salads, soups, stews, as a side dish, and even added into raw sauerkraut. It compliments grains from barley and quinoa to rice and millet. Wakame looks black in the package, but turns a delicate green color when cooked, brighter if blanched briefly in...

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Winter Wisdom: Chinese Medicine

Posted by on Nov 1, 2012

Winter Wisdom of Chinese Medicine The Nei Jing/Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Internal Medicine, which presents the cutting edge medical wisdom of its time, is full of brilliant advice for both prevention and cure.  Chapter 2 describe how to adjust our lifestyles to match the natural rhythm of the  seasons.   Winter is the season for “storage” in Chinese Medicine.  It is the storage of winter that allows for the “bursting forth” of Spring. As in nature so in humankind. Storage of what?  Storage of Qi, Blood, Yin, and Yang.  How? To store means to hold on to what you...

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