Eating with the Seasons Recipes

Wakame Sea Vegetable with Turnip, Pear, and American Ginseng

Posted by on Dec 5, 2012

    Wakame is a delicate, mild tasting, low calorie sea vegetable with a succulent texture. A favorite food in Japanese and Korean cuisine, it is traditionally cooked in miso soup, served on its own as a cold side dish (sunomono), or cooked with foods like kabocha squash. It can be adapted into American cooking in salads, soups, stews, as a side dish, and even added into raw sauerkraut. It compliments grains from barley and quinoa to rice and millet. Wakame looks black in the package, but turns a delicate green color when cooked, brighter if blanched briefly in...

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Dr. Wickermasinghe’s Ayurvedic Detox Tea for Colds and Flu

Posted by on Nov 1, 2012

Drink a quart or more a day of this delicious detox tea  if you are fighting off a cold or flu. You can also take this if you are already sick, to get better more quickly, and to prevent secondary infection in throat, sinus, or lungs. Do not use if you have a raging sore throat or high fever. Do use especially if you feel cold and have clear mucus or phlegm. This is a delicious tea made from ordinary kitchen spices that is a powerful remedy for common colds and flu. I learned it in Sri Lanka, from...

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Juiced Watermelon with Lime, Ginger, and Salt

Posted by on Aug 29, 2012

Alternative to Iced Drinks in Hot Weather Protect the Agni/ Yang in Summer: Juiced Watermelon with Lime, Ginger, and Salt The other day was quite hot (for SD!), and I swam at the beach after walking down from the top of Torrey Pines, and got home overheated and thirsty. I could still feel the sun hot on my head, even though I had worn a hat. I needed a lot of fluid and to cool down healthfully. An excellent alternative to iced beverages in hot conditions like that is juiced melon, especially watermelon. I juiced mine with fresh ginger...

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Summer Raw Beet, Sardine, and Pasta Salad

Posted by on Jul 8, 2012

Summer is a time when even cold dry (Vata) types or cold damp (Kapha) types can have little more raw foods. One of the ways to make raw foods more compatible for cold types with weaker digestive energy (Agni/Spleen Qi) is to have it in small amounts with other foods that stimulate digestion.   Necessity is the mother of invention. Today I was hungry, lazy, and the cupboard was bare. I had some leftover pasta, a tin of sardines, a can of chickpeas, a bunch of scallions and one lone beetroot in my frig. So I made a pasta...

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Anchor the Yang: Chinese Medicine, Acupuncture and Moxabustion Therapies for Summer Solstice

Posted by on Jun 25, 2012

The Chinese and Indian View: Life is a Passage Through Cycles   In Chinese Medicine (as also Ayurveda)  a fundamental concept is to prepare for what is ahead. This is not just generalized prevention as in eating a healthy diet or sleeping well, but is specific to how we relate to the passage of time.   Chinese Medicine sees life as cyclical: a  series of transitions, changes, phases,  and cycles; as a continuous movement between the forces of yang and yin, rather than as a linear progression of fixed events. The hard thing about living is dealing  with change. Cycles...

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Peppermint and Gotu Kola Ayurvedic Cooling Summer Tea

Posted by on Jun 2, 2012

Cooling Teas of Summer: Peppermint and Centella Asiatica (Brahmi, Gotu Kola, Pennywort) There are lots of ways to hydrate and cool off in summer, without damaging the Agni/digestive fire/Spleen Qi which is actually weaker in the hot weather than in the cold weather. In cold weather the Agni fires up in the core to keep us warm, but in the hot weather it is dispersed to the surface as we sweat. That is why we can eat heavier food in the winter than in the summer. So it is important to be careful about too much cooling food in...

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Curried Quinoa Super Food: Pacify Kapha in Late Winter/Early Spring

Posted by on Apr 11, 2012

Curried Quinoa Super Food: Pacify Kapha in Late Winter/Early Spring The ancient grain of the Incas, Quinoa has a delicate, nutty, slightly bitter flavor and the lightest texture of all grains.  This combination of bitter taste and light texture make it an ideal grain for Kapha types and Kapha imbalances such as excess weight, sluggishness, and issues of phlegm.  And while Quinoa is excellent for elevated Kapha  any time of year, it’s especially true  in Late Winter/Early Spring when Kapha predominates.  Quinoa  is also a very good choice for Pitta imbalances that benefit from the bitter taste and light...

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Late Winter Arugala for Kapha

Posted by on Mar 4, 2012

Late Winter Arugala for Kapha

Arugula is one of those green leafy vegetable that is so delicious both raw and cooked. It lends a nutty and spicy taste to other milder greens, and serves as a fine foil for feta cheese, walnuts, pumpkin seeds, and dried Turkish apricots (those plump dark un-sulphered ones you get at the health food store). I love cooked Arugula with Whole wheat pasta, in which case I quick fry under high heat chopped or lightly crushed garlic, I learned this from a chef–get the oil really hot, drop the garlic in, and stir for about 1 minute, don’t let...

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Baked Butternut Squash and Black Bean Stew

Posted by on Feb 16, 2012

Cooking Methods in Chinese Food Medicine: From Warm to Hot to Very Hot One of the aspects of Food Medicine we pay attention to in Chinese Medicine is the cooking method itself. Each method of cooking adds relative values of heat to the dish being prepared. Steaming and boiling are the mildest. Then, in degree of heat imparting come croc-pot slow cooking/stewing, stir frying, baking, and finally, the hottest–deep frying. That may explain in part why baked and deep fried goods are so satisfying–life is a process of warm biochemical or energetic transformations–qi and blood are warm, and baked/deep fried goods...

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Dandelion and Chicory Greens: Vegan Fast Food

Posted by on Jan 28, 2012

My idea of fast food: real food, made easily. Too many of my vegetarian and vegan friends are what I call “grilled cheese vegetarians.” Though they avoid meat, they also seem to avoid green vegetables and eat lots of bread and soy cheese or vegan sausages. I was on a meditation retreat a few years ago in Quebec, and it was surprising: lots of beans and grains and dairy, too, even ice cream, but zero green vegetables. Chinese medicine says: Protein for strength, Grains for energy, Green Vegetables to keep it all clean. Luckily, walking around the extensive uncut...

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Celery Root, Burdock, Brocolli, and Sea Food Miso Soup for Dinner

Posted by on Dec 23, 2011

Chick Pea Miso Soup with Celery Root and Scallops Ingredients 1 cup scallops or other sea food 1 cup chopped celery root 1 cup chopped burdock root 1/2 cup white, brown, or fresh shitake mushrooms 1 cup small broccoli florets 4″ piece of kombu sea veggie, cut into pieces with a scissor 4″ piece of wakame sea veggie, ditto 1-2 slices ginger root 2-3 chopped scallion 2 quarts water 1 tbsp chick pea miso paste or mellow white if unavailable 1 tbsp sweet white miso paste or more to taste a dash of white pepper if desired Directions 1)...

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7 Steps for a Healthy Winter from the Yellow Emperor

Posted by on Dec 23, 2011

Practical Advice for Winter from the Yellow Emperor’s Classic 1)In winter, get plenty of rest, more than your normal amount. Cast away Puritan guilt and Cowboy pride about getting by on lack of sleep. Leave martyrdom to the religious fanatics. 2)In Winter cultivate meditative lifestyles, do Tai Qi or Yoga in a warm sunny room, meditate every morning for 15 minutes or more, be kind to your friends and loving to your family. Winter is dominated by the water element, and water is soft. 3)Conserve your sexual energy a little more in winter, depending on your age and constitution....

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Winter in the "Nei Jing", the Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Chinese Medicine

Posted by on Dec 23, 2011

To stop for a moment and meditate on the passage of time, to feel time moving inside you, is to practice the value of the winter season, when movements appear underground, when earth’s energy has gone downward and inward. The sun too is on holiday low in the horizon, and cool Venus appears triumphant in a dazzling triangle alongside Jupiter and the waxing and waning Moon in mid-winter. To stop for a moment and meditate on the passage of time, to feel time moving inside you, is to practice the value of the winter season, when nature’s In the...

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Sea Vegetables for Health- Cleanse Lymph and Build Kidney Qi in Winter

Posted by on Dec 22, 2011

Sea Vegetables for Health Wild vegetables grow all over the earth and in the water. Dandelion greens, nettles, burdock are a few of the valuable and highly nutritious land vegetables that are easy to grow most anywhere. Sea vegetables also grow both North and South. I do not know about the tropics, but all over the far north from Scotland to Nova Scotia to Siberia and Japan people have been harvesting plants from the sea since ancient times. Lots of us are familiar now with the seaweed salad at the sushi bar. Sadly, most of the time what you...

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Common Cold in Ayurveda

Posted by on Dec 17, 2011

Common Cold in Ayurveda Common Cold in Ayurveda is called Pratishyaya and is seen in most cases as an aggravation of the Kapha dosha., being as it most often involves increased amounts of liquid discharge, build up of phlegm, and the sensation of feeling chilled. Elevated Kapha Why is common cold treated as Kapha elevation in Ayurveda? Because of both the location and nature of the symptoms associated with colds. One reason why Ayurveda sees the  Common Cold as Kapha elevation is because symptoms of colds occur in tissues that relate to Kapha, namely the ear, nose, throat, and lungs....

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