Posts by Eyton Shalom, M.S., L.Ac.

Lipedema and Chinese Medicine

Posted by on Jan 31, 2017

Lipedema and Chinese Medicine. Lynette wrote in and asked, “Can you explain what excess a body with Lipedema has. Are they damp diseases! feedback most welcomed for myself and my support groups!” Lipedema is a a disorder of the adipose (fat) tissue that occurs almost exclusively in women and involves abnormal swelling of the legs and hips all the way down to the ankles where the fat forms a ring just above the ankle. It is unrelated to obesity, and can be seen even in women with anorexia.   This poorly understood disorder is due to accumulations of fat...

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Is Breast-Feeding Really Better-Well Blog New York Times?

Posted by on Mar 4, 2014

Is Breast-Feeding Really Better? or, “To breast-feed or not to breast-feed, is that even a question?” Besides the obvious emotional factors, in which the baby gets to feel and smell and taste her mother in moments of such closeness they were used in Renaissance Art in Italy as one of the preferred ways of showing the Christian Diety, Joshua of Nazareth, as a suckling infant, Madonna with Child (note: the mother in this depiction comes before the infant),   besides all that psychological stuff that, even without Freud, but with common sense  it seems obvious could contribute to creating...

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Chinese Herbal Medicine and Acupuncture for Acute Compartment Syndrome

Posted by on Feb 27, 2014

Interesting article today in Scientific American on acute compartment syndrome, a potentially devastating injury that can even lead to amputation of a limb, and that also gives a glimpse into the role of the fascia in organizing the tissues of the body. Releasing the fascia is a big part of what myo-fascial acupuncture does. And when i treat people with soft tissue pain involving restrictions of the circulation, such as in Raynaud’s disease, but even just if their hands and or feet are cold to the touch or reported as cold, I almost always use a Chinese medicine herbal formula...

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Ayurveda: Vegeterianism or Not

Posted by on Feb 26, 2014

Does Ayurveda propose  vegetarianism and a vegeterian diet for all? Many modern Ayuvedic physicians, especially those teaching in Europe and the West, espouse lacto-vegeterianism as the ideal diet for everyone. But is this an accurate reflection of the Ayurvedic texts and of Ayurvedic medicine in history? In fact, the modern idea of vegetarian diet and vegeterianism as the ideal in Ayurvedic medicine  betrays a number of influences, ranging from the respect in India for all things foreign that is the result of colonialism and feelings of inferiority (indeed the popularity of Ayurveda in the west as led to an...

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The Effect of Hot Weather on Anger

Posted by on Feb 12, 2014

Here is a link to a post on my old blog about the effects of hot weather on anger and the relationship between the feelings of frustration, anger, irritability,  even rage, and the sensations of heat in the body itself.  There is a link in the other article to an article in Scientific American about how hot weather sparks aggression, and, even historically, revolution. What is so interesting is that now that we know how the essential biological mechanism of the fight or flight response drives the sympathetic nervous systems, we can explain in biological terms what Chinese Medicine...

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Acupuncture for Pain Relief vs. Vicodin, Norco, and Oxycontin

Posted by on Feb 11, 2014

Acupuncture vs. Vicodin and Oxycontin for Pain Relief. One of my many pet peeves regarding the neglect of Acupuncture for Pain Relief in Bio Medicine/Western Medicine, or Allopathy as they call it in the British Commonwealth, is the same as my pet peeve with government. How can such smart people be so smart some of the time, and so dumb other of the time? The answer is blind spots, blind spots born from the self selection for overly confident people that leads at times to arrogance, at other times to Doctor Denial Syndrome. (such as in the willingness to...

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R-U-Ved ProVata Tea

Posted by on Jan 17, 2014

R-U-Ved ProVata Tea A simple way to take the edge off of the cold, windy, dryness of the late Autumn early Winter Vata season is with Ayush’s R-U-Ved ProVata Tea. I have no stock in this company, and get nothing but good karma for recommending their fine products. You can easily make your own, too, though the tea bags are so convenient, especially with travel. R-U-Ved ProVata tea  is pro-Vata in the sense that it promotes balanced Vata; that is, it reduces Vata. We reduce, or pacify our doshas, because their natural tendency is to increase when our lifestyle, diet,...

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Vata in Winter

Posted by on Jan 17, 2014

I would like to talk about one of my favorite teas to pacify Vata in Winter: R-U-Ved ProVata Tea. First, though, lets just talk about the relationship between what happens to Vata in Winter and the qualities of the elements Air and Space, or Wind and Ether (as in etheric)  that the Vata dosha is a manifestion of.   Ayurveda describes the ways in which different kinds of foods, climates, activities, exercises, relationships attitudes, mental training, cultural ethos, stages of life, and times of year and the day can either elevate (increase, vitiate, aggravate) or pacify (balance or reduce)...

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Nuts as Weight Loss Aid

Posted by on Dec 18, 2013

This news does not surprise me, as in Ayurveda nuts are in the category of Rasayana–foods that promote health and longevity. They benefit the deepest  layers of the body, Ojas, commesurate with what Chinese Medicine calls Jing or Essence. As such you will find nuts in many “aphrodisiac formula” and are also considered medicinal food for the nervous system. Nuts are so satisfying and dense, its not for nothing that we called them in the old days “nut meats.” Perhaps that is why they may function as a weight loss aid when eaten as a snack. Eat nuts and...

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Ginger Root Tea Recipe for Winter

Posted by on Dec 16, 2013

Here is a great ginger root tea recipe for cold weather in Winter or Late Autumn. A basic principle in Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda is that life is a warm process. Its a process of warm transformation of cold air and raw food stuffs into warm, 98.5 degree blood and, in the stomach, a digestive soup that is 101 degrees, even warmer than the body temp overall. This basis of life, the transformation of air, food, and sleep into the energy of life is a process involving gas exchanges, maceration, chemical lysis, etc. It is a process that takes...

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Ayurvedic Oil Bath

Posted by on Dec 12, 2013

Benefits of Ayurvedic Oil Bath:  Foundation of Healthy Living Regular Ayurvedic Oil Bath,  or self massage with medicated herbal oils, or simply natural vegetable oils such as Sesame, Coconut, and Mustard oils, appropriate to your dosha  is an Ayurvedic Oil Bath, simply called Oil Bath in Indian Culture and in Ayurveda its also called Abhyanga. Regular oil bath is one of the practices at the center of a health promoting lifestyle in Ayurveda. Like diet and meditation it is used  to balance the doshas It also relieve stress, stimulate digestion and elimination, aids sleep, stimulates agni, and benefits the...

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Scientific American on How Meditation Benefits the Brain.

Posted by on Nov 7, 2013

Great video on the Scientific American page on the benefits of Meditation. Meditation in under the category of Mental Culture in Buddhist tradition; things we do to cultivate our mental abilities about ability to be good human beings. http://www.scientificamerican.com/video.cfm?id=how-does-meditation-change-the-brai2013-10-30&WT.mc_id=SA_CAT_BS_20131101Here’s the link...

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Anu Thailam Ayurvedic Nasal Oil

Posted by on Oct 25, 2013

Anu Thailm is the name of a wonderfully Ayuvedic Nasal Oil that is a very effective remedy for allergies, sinusitis, and head colds.   Thailam is the South Indian word for  oils  in which herbal medicines have been actually cooked. They are ancient recipes from classical texts, modified by family traditions, and are used exclusively for application to the skin and mucosa. They begin with sesame and/or coconut oil, to which ingredients from Triphala to Sandalwood to Ashwagandha  to Goat’s Milk and even Monsoon Rain are added and cooked on the lowest of flames for hours and hours. Oil massage...

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Autumn in the Nei Jing Su Wen Chinese Medical Classic

Posted by on Oct 22, 2013

Autumn in the Nei Jing Su Wen Chinese Medical Classic The essence of Chinese Medical Philosophy, which underpins the practice of Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine, is the need to live in harmony with nature, what the classics call “heaven and earth.” Heaven, because the sun and moon and weather all come from the sky (ndeed, when we think of each of our four seasons we think as much about what the sky looks and smells like–from the cold crisp nights of winter when the smell of snow is in the air, to the moist balmy days of spring, to...

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Autumn in Chinese Medicine

Posted by on Oct 22, 2013

Autumn Fall Autumn in Chinese Medicine is the time of falling, hence its secondary name. Spring up, Fall down.  In fact we even use the word autumn to describe a period in the human life span, the autumnal years, a period of beautiful maturity that is also verging on decline. In Autumn the celestial Qi, which is another way of describing the effects of the sun, moon, stars, and of course the weather (that in turn is a function of the effects of the sun in terms of the seasons), recedes in Autumn from its full bloom of summer....

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